Windows Media 9 Codecs for TCPMP player

I’ve noted that C230 users occasionally want to play Windows Media version 9 Audio and Video files and get messages to the effect that the codecs aren’t supported by the TCPMP player.   Actually the plugin is probably already present, but the driver file(s) that the plugin is looking for isn’t, even though WinCE higher than 4.2 is supposed to include them (per Microsoft).   Found this question on amida’s site this evening and thought I’d package up the codecs to add into the Script folder of either of our Unlock packages to resolve the issue.

Oh, and bleep55, I’m the one with the Coffee Fund.    If this resolves your problem, I’ll take mine black, thank you.  🙂

Bleep55 said on April 23rd, 2008 at 7:43 pm

I am trying to add a video to the Mio. I am getting the error message : Video codec (Windows Media Video 9) not supported by the player. Is there something that needs to be changed in the Mio or does the video need to be reformatted? I get audio but no video…

…Donation to your coffee fund has been made. Thanks again.

The package is available here.

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Great article on GPS…

[NOTE: Overlook the fact that this article is written for Engineers – it actually explains things like why the GPS sometimes takes so long to lock in, especially after it’s been off for awhile (see the “Time for Acquisition” section).]

GPS Modules put Products on the Map

Jon Titus, Senior Technical Editor
Ecnmag.com – April 01, 2008

A GPS receiver can tell you where you are, but environmental conditions and design factors influence accuracy. 

When a product such as a child locator, surveying instrument, or autonomous vehicle requires position information, a GPS module can provide it. Prices for devices that provide this information range from less than a dollar for chips used in cell phones to hundreds of dollars for modules and boards that offer high accuracy. Cell-phone GPS receivers might get you “close enough,” but higher-end modules can offer centimeter accuracy. “At its simplest, a GPS receiver acquires satellite signals, decodes their information, and calculates a position, time, and velocity,” explained Joel Avey, director of marketing at Trimble for the company’s advanced devices.

Once in a while engineers unfamiliar with GPS technology misunderstand how it works. “They may think a GPS module communicates with satellites,” said Ken Hartman, chief technology officer at the Navsync Division of Connor Winfield. “A GPS module only receives the satellites’ information and the module cannot report its position to a remote location unless you build that capability into a product.” After engineers get past a few misconceptions, they understand how the GPS system works.
 
Because GPS-module vendors offer such a wide array of products, Avey tells designers and system integrators to first thoroughly understand their need for GPS information. “What do you want to accomplish and what kind of operating environment do you expect?” asked Avey. “Often people have unrealistic expectations for a GPS receiver and they don’t understand what a receiver can and cannot do. So they should ask vendors, ‘Is GPS feasible for my product? Can a GPS receiver operate under X, Y, or Z conditions? And what kind of accuracy can I expect in this application?’”

Many engineers assume that just because a GPS receiver indicates a location, that represents the correct physical position. A receiver works with the information it has, and sometimes that information includes errors. “Often engineers do not consider the sources of errors, so we must explain them,” said Jonathan Auld, development manager for survey and core products at Novatel. “First, satellite orbits aren’t precise, so a GPS receiver won’t know a satellite’s position with an accuracy of better than about one or two meters. Second, the clocks onboard the satellite introduce small errors. Third, as the weak GPS signals move through the ionosphere and troposphere those layers contribute errors. Fourth, nearer the receiver, signals can reflect from nearby objects and interfere with the main signal. And fifth, the GPS receiver and its surrounding circuits contribute some electrical noise.” Bundle those together — less system noise — and you come up with user equivalent range error. (see For further reading) According to Robert Snow, director of product marketing in the Professional Business Unit at Magellan, engineers most often misunderstand how sky conditions and a receiver’s “view” of the sky will affect accuracy. “You would get the best accuracy in a position surrounded by satellites including those “underneath” the Earth,” said Snow. “But satellite signals do not pass through the Earth, so the next best location is on the ocean where a receiver sees satellites across the sky and thus will produce a very accurate horizontal position. As buildings, trees, or a tunnel block the sky, conditions cause a receiver to ‘lose’ satellites, which decreases accuracy.” Snow noted that vertical accuracy is about 1½ times worse than horizontal accuracy because you don’t have any satellites “underneath” you.

Obstructions not only attenuate satellite signals, they can completely block them so receivers cannot detect signals from some of the satellites. When you drive through a city, for example, a GPS receiver can pick up signals from only a few satellites. And in some cases, even in an open area, a GPS receiver may not get useful signals from all visible satellites.

The degradation of accuracy measurements caused by the “geometry” or position of usable satellites falls under the heading of dilution of precision (DOP) or geometric dilution of precision. DOP characteristics apply individually to horizontal, vertical, 3-D, and time information. Think of DOP this way: Suppose you must triangulate the position of a distant water tower. You make angular measurements from two positions 10 feet apart at your known location. Then you choose two other known positions three miles apart and make another pair of angular measurements. Obviously as you increase the baseline-measurement distance, the accuracy of your triangulated distance measurement increases. Likewise, better accuracy results from a wider spread of satellites visible at a receiver’s location.“Most GPS receivers will calculate a DOP value — if you want it — so you can determine accuracy based upon the satellites in view,” noted Magellan’s Snow. “Geometry can severely degrade accuracy.” DOP values range from 1 (ideal) to 21-50 (poor).

A signal that arrives via multiple paths as it reflects off hard surfaces such as cars and buildings also can degrade accuracy. “Those signals arrive later than they should, so they seem to a GPS receiver as though they originated at a more-distant satellite. So, the receiver places your location a bit off.” said Snow. “We have special receivers that reduce multipath effects. Most vendors try to reduce them in one way or another. Mitigating the affects of multipath signals is very important in terms of maintaining accuracy.”

Time for Acquisition

It takes time for a GPS receiver to acquire a fix on its position, and developers often use time-to-first-fix specs to compare receiver performance. “System designers may not realize the receiver must go through an acquisition, or search, process that searches the GPS RF spectrum for signals and then process the received data,” explained Trimble’s Avey. “After the receiver acquires the satellite signals, it can interpret the data and go into a tracking mode. The acquisition phase requires a stronger signal, or higher receiver sensitivity, than the tracking phase. During acquisition, the receiver must pick signals out of background noise and verify they are primary signals and not a side-lobe signal or a false-lock signal. After verifying it has the correct signals, the receiver can track satellites as lower signal levels because it knows what to look for in the signals it receives.”

Avey explained that in some cases a receiver just cannot “find” enough satellite signals to get a good fix, due to low signal levels caused by dense foliage and tree canopies, tunnels, buildings, and so on. “So engineers might say, ‘You specified the receiver could operate at such-and-such a signal level, but it doesn’t.’ They don’t understand there is a difference between the signal levels needed for acquisition and tracking.”

Outdoors with clear view of the sky, acquisition can require from one to 10 seconds, depending on the receiver and the environment. According to Avey a worst-case startup in which the GPS receiver has no information about time, position, or satellites could take from 40 to 45 seconds. “In 99 percent of the cases, it should take under a minute. But engineers must understand that acquisitions depend on how much information a receiver has. When a receiver knows the time of day, its location to within several kilometers, and has a complete set of almanac and ephemeris information for the satellites, startup can proceed quickly,” noted Avey. Typically, receivers store that information in memory and they maintain a real-time clock, even in sleep or low-power modes.

Some applications can benefit from network assist information that provides location and other data. A GPS receiver will “see” at least four satellites 99.99 percent of the time. But, the receiver needs to know which of the satellites it can “see” at a given location or time. (Otherwise, it must “hunt” for unique satellite signatures, which can take time.) “Network-assist information provides satellite-constellation, time, location, and almanac data to a receiver,” noted Navsync’s Hartman. “Then a receiver can determine which satellites to look for. By narrowing the search criteria, the receiver can look for a lower signal level from specific satellites, which it could not do if it had no information about visible satellite positions. Keep in mind that the network-assist information comes from a remote source, and it provides data for that location. So if you plan to use network-assist information, choose a source within about 100 km of your receiver’s location.” Without network-assist information, Hartman reported seeing a GPS receiver take 45 minutes to obtain a position fix.

The network-assist information comes from cellular-service providers as well as from some GPS-receiver manufacturers. “Upon request we provide that data for our customers and we can explain how they can supply their own network-assist information to receivers,” said Hartman. “Engineers might think network-assist data will let a receiver lock onto satellites regardless of signal levels and local conditions. But the receiver is always up against its fundamental signal-to-noise limits, so under poor conditions, even with network-assist data, a receiver might not lock onto satellites.”

Antennas Make or Break Performance

“We make systems that measure with centimeter accuracy,” said Magellan’s Snow. “So we pay a lot of attention to antenna design and placement, ground planes, and low-noise amplifiers. They ensure our equipment will make excellent measurements.” So, engineers must ensure that a receiver gets good signals: They cannot simply run a long piece of cable from a receiver to an antenna and expect good results. In some applications, they may need a low-noise amplifier at the antenna and they may need assistance with antenna designs.

Engineers should keep passive antennas close to a GPS receiver. “In all cases, a GPS receiver provides the position of its antenna and not the receiver,” stressed Snow. “So if you have a GPS receiver on a ship, you need to know the relationship on the antenna to the ship’s keel so you can relate the antenna position to the ship’s actual position.”

Compare Equivalent Receiver Specs

Before you include a GPS receiver in a product, carefully examine its specifications and compare them with those of other receivers. Unfortunately, these comparisons get complicated. “Companies often use different units to specify accuracy,” said Jonathan Auld of Novatel. “So, engineers see specs such as ‘accurate to 50 cm CEP,’ ‘accurate to 50 cm RMS,’ or ‘accurate to 50 cm 2DRMS.’ You must know how to analyze and convert between those different accuracy measures, because 50 cm CEP refers to the radius of a circle in which 50 percent of the values occur, while 50 cm 2DRMS equals better than 50 cm accuracy 95 percent of the time.” CEP stands for circular error probable and 2DRMS equals two times the horizontal RMS error value. (See For further reading)

 

Vendors will lend engineers GPS receivers so they can run their own tests. To ensure valid test results, test the receivers in the same physical location. Auld recommended engineers connect all the test receivers to one antenna through a splitter. (Tests may need amplifiers or attenuators to ensure each unit receives the signal amplitude called for by its manufacturer.) “That arrangement eliminates any environmental differences. If you separate antennas by, say, 10 feet, one may ‘see’ multipath signals because you put it closer to a metal surface, such as an air vent. So, the different signal environments could skew test results. If possible, all test receivers should ‘see’ the same RF signals. When receivers come with built-in antennas, you can at least place the receivers near each other for testing. We recommend a spacing of more than a meter so antennas don’t interfere with each other.”This type of testing provides an added benefit: All receivers see the same constellation of satellites. If you test receiver A in the morning and receiver B in the afternoon, satellite positions will have changed, as may have ionospheric or tropospheric conditions.

“If you cannot test all receivers simultaneously, you can run a 24-hour test,” noted Sara Masterson, product manager for survey and core products at Novatel. “The satellite constellation pattern repeats every 23 hours and 56 minutes. But, testing over the same 24-hour period the next day doesn’t eliminate changes in the atmosphere due to a solar storm or other effect.”

In addition, the National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Executive Committee, which oversees the GPS satellites may shut down one satellite and activate a spare during routine operations. So, day-to-day test conditions can change more than you might think. The U.S. Coast Guard “GPS Notice Advisory to Navstar Users” documents (NANUs) disseminate information about the GPS constellation. www.navcen.uscg.gov.

For Further Reading

Indoor GPS,” AN01, Navsync GPS Technologies.

Network Assistance,” AN02, Navsync GPS Technologies.

“GPS Position Accuracy Measures,” APN-029 (Rev 1), Novatel, 2003.

Trimble’s planning software, a stand-alone software tool helps analyze visibility of GPS, GLONASS, IGSO and geostationary satellites. (Download.)

Van Diggelen, Frank, “GPS Accuracy: Lies, Damn Lies, and Statistics,” GPS World, 2007.

Wormley, Samuel J., “GPS Errors & Estimating Your Receiver’s Accuracy.”
 

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QuickSilver CarLocator ~ ver 1.48

(The title screen artwork is by Art Fitzpatrick and can be purchased here.   I just felt that a link would be the right thing to do, in return for borrowing part of this great painting – ’69 Pontiac GTO at Hydra Island  ) )
carlocator11.jpg
 

Best Quicksilver skin yet!!

Many thanks to OP for his contributions (which I’ve enhanced some more 🙂 )

Clicking on the Save Car Location button saves 4 clicks…

and takes you right to this screen…

carlocator16.jpg

Click on Coordinates, then Done, and your Car’s present parked location is in memory.

carlocator5a.jpg

To locate your parked car…

carlocator13.jpg
.
carlocator14.jpg

No stylus required with this skin!! 

 


 

QuickSilver CarLocator  ~ Version 1.48

  1. Tweaked the Flyover button to comply with the Phase 3 (inactive) behavior of the others  – ameridan

  2. Fixed and repositioned the Stop Recording Track Log button on the map screen that resulted in an error  – ameridan
  3. Revised tepsi.bmp file so that Navigation bar buttons work properly  – ameridan
  4. Right third of Navigation bar changed from Speak Last Command to Large Target Street font – OP
  5. Middle third of Navigation bar remains as Speak Last Command  – ameridan
  6. Left third of Navigation bar no longer serves as shortcut to Route screen  – ameridan
  7. Digital font used for Clock, Speed, and Altimeter – OP and ameridan
  8. Set FavPOI script written to choose MyPOI group as favorite – OP
    favcat21.jpg
  9. Cursor button text changes from “Cursor” to “Close” when menu bar is opened – ameridan
  10. Back button changed from small pale green arrow to larger yellow arrow  – ameridan
  11. Added “Clear Pins” button to History screen, and changed Clear button text to “Clear All”  – ameridan
  12. Cockpit screen & Map screen menu bars – back button changed from down arrow to left arrow  – ameridan
  13. Settings button added for quick access to Cockpit Settings – ameridan
  14. Display/hide toggle button in Cockpit settings menu (in place of zoombar display/hide) for both FavPOI and Cockpit Settings buttons – ameridan
  15. Added toggle option in Cockpit settings for auto day/nite in double-button with manual toggle – ameridan
  16. Added toggle option for Cursor menu popup in double-button with Info show/hide toggle – OP and ameridan
  17. Added track recording start/stop button  in double-button with Manage track logs button – also serves as large indicator that track logs are RECORDING. – ameridan

 

This skin by default names the two favorites Home and Car, and the main screen has a new button to program your current location and assigns it to Car, the intent being that it will facilitate finding your Car later.

This is a skin alternative, not an Unlock package, and can be used as a new skin without unlocking – just don’t use the Exit button.

To avoid a lot of confusion when doing Route preplanning, stay in the Browse Map mode (with Auto-Recalculation turned off), since Cockpit mode is always focused on your current location and will appear to be ignoring your route.


 

   Version Log…

QuickSilver Reborn – A MioMap 3.3 Skin
Created By Ashwin Wavde
Inspired by Quicksilver for MioMap 3.2 by Matt Mullins (roscoe)

QuickSilver Reborn 1.0
* QuickSilver 1.0 for MioMap 3.2 modded for MioMap 3.3
* Added Cockpit Bar transparency
* Fixed turn distance guide visibility
* Various other improvements

QuickSilver Reborn 1.1
Compiled 2:56 PM 4/08/2007
*Adding compatability for split-screen data.zip

QuickSilver Reborn 1.3

*Added simple static car over arrow

Quicksilver ’66 for C230
*Icons redone by CD
*GTO car over cockpit arrow –  CD
*added toggle buttons cockpit view <-> browse map view – CD
*config folder fixed for C230 (roundabouts weren’t being announced) – ameridan

Quicksilver CarLocator for C230 1.45
Compiled 6:00 PM 2/15/2008
*2nd favorite tailored to Car location, rather than Work – ameridan
*All Favorite icons redone – ameridan
*New shortcut button on Main Screen to input location coordinates of parked car – ameridan

Quicksilver CarLocator for C230 1.46
Compiled 7:30 PM 2/27/2008
*added the the Binocular (Fit Route view on screen) and Route calculator (Recalculate toggling method each time) from the Olivercp Skin to the Browse Map screen – OP
*added POI button to cockpit screen – OP
*redid POI button to match others – ameridan

Quicksilver CarLocator 1.47
Compiled 12:00 PM 3/6/2008 – ameridan
*toggle for displaying POI button added to Map Settings – OP
*redid flyover button – ameridan
*added pin/unpin button to browse_map cursor popup – ameridan

 


  Version 1.48 download is available HERE.   

Installation Instructions:

The file DATA.ZIP   should simply replace (after backing up your original) AS-IS (don’t unzip):
 
  •    \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap2\DATA.ZIP, if C230 is unlocked
  •    \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap\DATA.ZIP, if C230 is locked 

After installing DATA.ZIP, you should set a Favorite POI group before clicking on the FavPOI button on the Cockpit screen or you may get a fatal error that ends the program and requires you to start it up again. 


As an option to try out Dominique’s Skins trick in an unlocked C230, copy the “SKIN” folder from the  Version 1.46  download into \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap2  (or the contents of DATA.ZIP within should be added into  \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap2\SKIN\DATA.ZIP).    See the Blog on Version 1.46 for more on this.


Comments (22)

Geocaching with the C230!

~~ actual screenshots from my C230 ~~

Well, I’ve finally figured out how to get a great Geocache program running on the Mio C230 that appears to have all of the features we’ve been looking for for straight-line navigation, marine navigation, etc. as well.   My testing indicates that it deactivates Static Navigation as well, so that accurate tracks while hiking under 3 mph are possible. 

Al Harrington is considered a Geocache expert and as you’ll see in excerpts from an article he wrote, courtesy of Smartphone & PocketPC magazine, he highly recommends the program as well, as you’ll see in his article I’m including here.

Geocaching

Find hidden treasures with a GPS-enabled Pocket PC

   

Geocaching is a world-wide sport where people use Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to find hidden treasures (caches). Before May 2000, GPS satellites were configured with “selective availability,” which limited the accuracy of personal GPS units. In May 2000 the Clinton Administration officially removed this limitation, giving civilian GPS units much greater accuracy. Soon after this a GPS enthusiast hid a cache and posted the coordinates on an Internet newsgroup. A few months later, Jeremy Irish created Geocaching.com, the major Web site supporting this new sport. In the six years since the first cache was hidden, geocaching has grown dramatically. Currently, there are 250,000 active caches in over 200 countries.

The basic object of the game is to find these caches and log your finds on Geocaching.com (or another geocaching Web site). “Take something, leave something” is the geocaching motto, and most caches contain trinkets to trade and a logbook to record your find. Caches are located everywhere, from remote forest locations to busy mall parking lots. I live in a typical suburban neighborhood and there are over 200 located within a 5 mile radius of my house. You can find a list of all caches near you on Geocaching.com.

…Normally, there are two phases to geocaching: driving to the general location and walking around looking for the cache. While you’re driving it’s nice to have the Pocket PC somewhere visible and secure, so it’s a good idea to purchase a vehicle mount. I use the Arkon Powered PDA mount for my iPAQ (http://www.arkon.com). I like this mount because it not only secures my Pocket PC, it also includes a built-in speaker that helps me to hear the voice navigation instructions of my GPS software over the noise of my truck’s diesel engine.

Running down your Pocket PC’s battery while you’re geocaching is no fun. At a minimum you should invest in a cigarette lighter adapter for your vehicle, which lets you power and charge your Pocket PC while you’re driving. Also, you might want to consider a rugged case to protect your device, especially if you plan on Geocaching in the rain. OtterBox (http://www.otterbox.com) has solutions for most Pocket PCs. They also have a case for Bluetooth GPS receivers.

Geocaching software

Most GPS navigation software is designed for vehicle navigation and is fine to help you get to the general location of a geocache. We published a comprehensive review of these in the September 2005 issue of Smartphone & Pocket PC magazine. Unfortunately, these programs don’t help much when you get out of the car and start tromping through fields. Other software packages, designed specifically for geocaching, are needed.

Before you select your software it is a good idea to understand a little about how geocache information is stored. Manually typing in coordinates can be time consuming, so Geocaching.com provides two types of files to help with this. The simplest and free version is a LOC file. It contains the basic information needed to find a cache (name and the “waypoint” or coordinates). If you become a premium member of Geocaching.com you can also download GPX files, which not only contain the name and coordinates, but also all the cache details including description, hints, and recent log entries. Premium members can also set up “pocket queries” which e-mail you a list of up to 500 caches based on your search criteria. GPX files are definitely the way to go so if you are serious about geocaching I highly recommend becoming a premium member of Geocaching.com. The cost for this is only $3 per month or $30 for an entire year.

There are several geocaching programs for the Pocket PC. Some are focused on “paperless caching,” which uses the Pocket PC as a database to organize all the cache information (including description, hints, log entries, etc.). Other software packages are focused on navigation-helping you get to the cache site.

To make the most out of your Pocket PC geocaching experience you will want software that can load LOC or GPX files directly. The software package I use is BeeLineGPS (http://www.visualgps.net/). BeeLineGPS not only provides navigation capabilities but also stores all the paperless cache information so there is no need for me to switch between programs.

Let’s go geocaching!

Now that you have your hardware and software, it’s time to go geocaching. The first step is to identify the caches you want to look for. To do this, go to the “Search for caches” section of Geocaching.com and enter the Zip code of the area you’re interested in. (You can also search by country or state.) This will take you to a list of caches in the area. Select the cache(s) you are interested in and download the cache information to your Pocket PC. Once you load this into your navigation software you are ready to hit the road.

…Once I get near the cache site I load BeelineGPS. The map screen will show all caches located near your current position. From the map screen I tap on the cache and select Goto Waypoint. I then change to the Panel tab which gives me a large compass showing me which direction to go and the distance to the cache site.

By default BeeLineGPS will notify you when you are within 100 feet of your destination. With geocaching this isn’t very useful, so change the default to 1 or 2 feet. When you’re within this distance, the icon on the map page will change to show that you’ve found the cache (Fig. 4).

Unfortunately, there are a number of factors that can affect accuracy. Even under ideal conditions, with the default set to 1 foot, your accuracy may only be 15 feet. That means that even if BeeLineGPS indicates that you are at the cache site, it could still be located within a 15′ radius of where you’re standing.

This is when the real hunt begins, and this is where having the cache details on your Pocket PC comes in very handy. Most cache details will give you a hint to the location (e.g., “try to keep your feet dry” could indicate that the cache is located right next to the stream) and sometimes the log entries of other visitors will point you in the right direction (Fig 5 below)

The cache is usually a small weather sealed box of some sort. Once you find it, open it up, swap treasures, and sign the log. You can also enter information about your find on your Pocket PC. To do this open the BeeLineGPS map screen, tap on the icon representing the cache, and select Geocache >Found It from the pop-up menu. At this point you are prompted to enter “field notes” about the cache. These notes will help you remember the specific about the cache and come in handy, especially if you’re hunting for more than one cache.

Finding your way back

If your cache hunt took you far into the wilderness, you may not remember exactly how you got there. One very helpful feature of BeeLineGPS is tracking. Tracking displays a representation of the path you took from the point you started at to your current position.

The meandering dotted line indicates the path you actually took to the cache. It takes into account trees, lakes, and other obstacles you had to navigate around, and is more helpful in finding your way back than the straight red line in the figure. Important note: make sure you mark your starting location before you head off into the wilderness looking for the cache. Otherwise, you won’t be able to set your original starting location as your new destination. With BeeLineGPS you do this by selecting Mark Waypoint at Current Position from the Waypoint menu. When ready to head back simply select this waypoint as your destination and tap on “Goto.” You can now use the tracking line on the map page to help you get back to your starting point.



BeeLineGPS is a high performance Pocket PC cache navigation and management software tool. Import GPX files and manage thousands of waypoints with the advanced Waypoint Manger. View, manage and hunt geocaches with ease and confidence while having fun, a perfect paperless solution. BeeLineGPS also includes active waypoint technology where a waypoint can trigger a warning window for speed traps, safety cameras or play a sound byte while on a guided tour. Other features include waypoint averaging, altitude profiling and a comprehensive trip computer. BeeLineGPS is the ultimate GPS tool for your geocaching and outdoor needs.BeeLineGPS waypoint database can support thousands of waypoints with over 120 icons to  depict specific locations. If you don’t see a specific icon, ask for it and we’ll add it.

Geocaching

 
BeeLineGPS has specific features to help the Geocacher find and manage the cache. With many Geocache icons, BeeLineGPS can help identify found, attempted, new and other cache states. Below shows the states and icons associated with these states. BeeLineGPS will also show detailed information using the web browser for each cache by simply clicking on the cache waypoint on the map.Using the GoTo waypoint feature along with the map screen, you can zero in on to the cache using the on-screen direction finder.

Archived or missing This icon shows that this is an archived or missing cache.
Attempted Shows that an attempt was made to find this cache, but has not yet been found.
Bonus This icon is handy to show bonus caches
Earthcache Indicates that a unique geological features exist here.
First to Find Shows that this cache was a First to Find! (FTF)
Found This icon represents a found cache, but not yet recorded on the Geocache web site.
Found and recorded This icon shows that this cache has been found and recorded on to the Geocache web site.
Future Cache This is a future cache — The date on the cache shows a date this is in the future from the current date on the Pocket PC.
Letterbox Cache Shows that this cache is a letterbox cache where only clues give you the location of the cache.
Milestone Shows that this cache was a personal milestone.
Multi Cache Shows that this cache is part of a multi-cache.
My Cache This icon that this is a cache that you have hidden.
Mystery Cache Mystery or puzzle cache
New Cache If the cache has been placed within 30 days of the current date, then the “Not Found” icon will show as a new cache icon.
Not Found This is the standard icon for caches that have not yet been found.
To Do This icon shows that you plan to find this cache and is still on your to do list.
Unknown Cache Same as Mystery Cache
Virtual Cache Indicates a cache made of a location. Point of Interest.


 


 

 


BeeLineGPS included a comprehensive trip computer that will allow you to show the distance to a specific waypoint, show total distance traveled (odometer),  total altitude ascent/descent, percent grade/hill climb, bearing and many other item. The trip computer contains over 30 programmable trip computer items.Import and waypoints using the standard GPS Exchange format (GPX). Export tracks to GPX, CSV and Google Earth KML format.


Cache detail/info Example

Trip Computer Fields

Altitude
Altitude Difference
Average Grade
Average Speed
Average Grade Ascent
Average Grade Descent
Battery Status
Bearing (numeric)
Bearing (symbolic N,S,E and W)
Cross Track Error
Distance to Waypoint
ETA (12/24 hour mode)
ETE (12/24 hour mode)
Gradient
Heading (numeric)
Heading (symbolic)
Maximum Altitude
Maximum Gradient
Maximum Speed
Minimum Altitude
Minimum Gradient
Odometer
Time (12/24 Hour)
Total Altitude Ascent
Total Altitude Descent
Trip Duration

 

 

BeeLineGPS  Features

 
  • Simple mapping

  • Tracks

  • Export Tracks to Google Earth KML files (learn more…)

  • Map Modes: Course Up and North Up

  • Programmable navigation fields (Map and Trip screens) (Bearing, Bearing Symbolic, Cross Track Error, Distance to Waypoint, ETE, ETA. Heading, Heading Symbolic, Odometer,  Speed, Max Speed, Maximum Altitude, Minimum Altitude, Average Speed, Trip Duration and Altitude Difference (max-min), gradient (min,max and average), altitude total ascent/decent and a lot more)

  • Altitude, speed and acceleration profiling

  • Waypoint management – thousands of waypoints (PDA memory limitations apply)

  • Waypoint Averaging

    • Programmable Dilution of Precision (DOP) threshold to enhance average calculation

    • Standard deviation of the position to show the position accuracy

  • Waypoint Projection

  • Support for GPX and CSV files

  • Active waypoints

    • Setup active waypoints to play a sound file when they are within a programmable range

    • BeeLineGPS can alert when you are near a geocache, safety camera.

  • Multiple screens

    • Analog gauge panel – Altitude, speed, compass and vertical speed

    • GPS Status – Position, Azimuth/Elevation,Satellite Signal Quality

    • Trip/Digital Panel

    • Map

    • Analysis

  • NMEA logging – recording and playback

  • Differential mode indication

  • Over 120 waypoint icons to choose from

  • Support for any screen resolution

  • Support for VGA screen resolution

  • Support for landscape and square screens

  • User configurable screens

Map showing many caches and waypoints

Hunting a cache Example. Note the arrow pointing to the direction of the “go to” waypoint

 

 

 

 

Applications

 
  • Geocaching – Supported states and icons
    Archived

    Attempted

    Earth Cache
    First to Find (FTF)
    Found
    Found and logged
    Future Cache
    Letterbox Cache
    Milestone
    Multi Cache
    My Cache
    Mystery Cache
    New Cache – Placed within 30 days
    Not Found
    To do
    Unknown/Mystery Cache
    Virtual Cache
       
       
  • Safety, Red Light and Speed camera warnings – Import GPX and CSV files

    Red Light Camera

    Roadside Camera
    Speed Camera
       
  • Voice Guided Tours – Setup active waypoints to trigger a sound file describing a specific location.

  • Data logging (NMEA) and playback

  • Hiking

  • Biking (altitude analysis, percent grade (max, mind))

  • Position Averaging and analysis

  


Yes, the program is BeeLineGPS ( see http://www.visualgps.net/BeeLineGPS for more information and http://www.visualgps.net/BeeLineGPS/BeeLineGPSInstall.CAB  for the latest version of software) and my package of it along with the drivers needed to run it on the MIO C230 is available at http://www.mediafire.com/?zjhmpy1dbc1 

This is a good example of how it takes the right combination of drivers to get some programs running.   You would think that just adding the program into the Scripts folder that already contains your drivers would do the trick, but some drivers must cancel out others, as it took a few hours for me to figure out the exact versions and combination of drivers I needed to add to the BeelineGPS download.

The additional drivers I needed to add are:

  • AYGSHELL.DLL (of course)
  • DOCLIST.DLL
  • MFCCE300.DLL
  • OLECE300.DLL

To show appreciation of the work put into this project I would appreciate if the Ameridan_Read_Me.txt file remains with your download of the driver files I added.    I’ve also added a .reg file I created for those having problems getting the program to detect the GPS chip, which you can import into your registry using your Reg Editor.    I recommend setting the GPS Serial Port config manually (COM2 @ 38400 baud (or 4800 for some)), since the Automatic config flew right past the baud setting for me.

 Although designed for portrait mode, it has been upgraded such that almost everything works in our 320×240 landscape mode.  So far, the only thing that appears not to work are the help screens, which are html and need a web browser.    The Waypoint Manager creates it’s own database, but it seems to build html pages for the waypoint data page displays.    I’ve pointed the default folder for the .wpt database to \Storage Card\Tracks so that it will use the same area as exported tracks using MioMap.

Another hint – to get to the options in the Panel screen, you’ve got to tap and hold your stylus on the screen for a few seconds. 

The program is a 30-day trial version, but if it works as expected, there will probably be quite a few takers among the C230 Blog readers 🙂   My understanding is that a nag screen remains beyond the 30-day limit, but that the program continues to function, in case you still haven’t made up your mind at that point.

BeelineGPS version 1.83 Build 125
with additional files needed to run on the Mio C230
compiled by Ameridan @ http://C230.wordpress.com
***************************************************
Please keep this document with the package in
appreciation of the many hours invested to get the
program running.

Install the entire folder into either:
\Storage Card\BeelineGPS  OR
\My Flash Disk\BeelineGPS

I’ve also created a registry file that you can
import into your registry if you have problems, or
to add into your reboot procedure (i.e. autopatcher.mscr file)
if you want the settings retained during hard resets.

Enjoy!!


Enjoy!!

If you are pleased with the helpfulness of my Blog Site and the capabilities of your Unlocked Mio C230 using my downloads, and haven’t already done so, kindly consider a small donation to my coffee fund.


These are the Edit Waypoint screens I pull up now…

Comments (99)

Not New Unlock Packages, just bringing them back to the front of the line… ~~~Also an announcement regarding MioMap~~~

coffeeon.gif  Bringing the most recent Unlock & MioMap Menu packages  back to the front of the line in my Blog…

Unlocking the Mio C230 – Version 3.5 with Route, Theme, Screen, Settings & Skins Management

main_3_5.jpg

Upgrade of MioMap Menu to Ver 3.6 – Deleting individual entries from Location History & Dominique’s Skin Trick

menu36a.jpg


coffeeon.gif  Just announced this week…

Nav N Go suspends deliveries to Mio

Nav N Go regretfully announces the immediate suspension of all business activities with one of its partners, Mio International Ltd., a 100%-owned subsidiary of Mitac International Corporation, as a result of continuous breaches of contract.

Nav N Go’s award-winning navigation software, iGO My Way [MioMap is Mio’s adaptation of this iGo title], had been included in all Mio devices for Europe, North America and other regions. Mio, always considered a strategic partner by Nav N Go, has dramatically increased its market share in the last few years as a result of using Nav N Go solutions.

Nav N Go, out of respect for its current and potential future partners, does not wish to go into the details of its decision, and asserts that every effort will be made to resolve the situation amicably.

Nav N Go, as one of the main software providers to the navigation industry, still predicts major growth in turnover compared to previous years, based on its current contracts with leading market players.

I think it is safe to assume that there probably won’t be any iGo updates to MioMap for our C230 units, nor any official updates to the TeleAtlas maps that are paired with MioMap, making the enhanced skins and MioMap menus that we have developed that much more valuable!


If you are pleased with the helpfulness of my Blog Site and the capabilities of your Unlocked Mio C230 using my downloads, and haven’t already done so, kindly consider a small donation to my coffee fund by clicking on the cup.

cup-of-coffee.jpgclick

Thank you!!

Comments (25)

QuickSilver CarLocator ~ Version 1.47

(The title screen artwork is by Art Fitzpatrick and can be purchased here.   I just felt that a link would be the right thing to do, in return for borrowing part of this great painting – ’69 Pontiac GTO at Hydra Island  ) )
carlocator11.jpg
.
carlocator20.jpg
.

coffeeon.gif  Clicking on the Save Car Location button saves 4 clicks…

carlocator2a.jpg

coffeeon.gif  and takes you right to this screen…

carlocator16.jpg

coffeeon.gif  Click on Coordinates, then Done, and your Car’s present parked location is in memory.

carlocator5a.jpg

coffeeon.gif  To locate your parked car…

carlocator13.jpg
.
carlocator14.jpg

coffeeon.gif  QuickSilver CarLocator  ~ Version 1.47

  1. Reincorporated the additional Pin/Unpin feature of the Map cursor popup menu that Mio had removed for the C220 and C230.  To add a thumbtack pin, tap the screen where you’d like it to appear and select Pin.    To delete a pin, tap the pin and select Unpin.
    carlocator28.jpg
  2. OP’s incorporation of the Binocular button (Fit Route view on screen) and the Route calculator button (Recalculate toggling method each time, also known as the trip computer) borrowed from the Olivercp Skin (GREAT JOB OP!!) in the Browse Map screen.   I tweaked the placement of these buttons to make them easier to access with your finger.   Note that these buttons only appear if there is a route in memory.
    carlocator21.jpg
  3. OP’s incorporation of the POI button in the Cockpit screen and his subsequent button added in version 1.47 in the Map Settings menu to toggle it’s display on the map screen.
    carlocator24.jpg
  4. I took the liberty of upgrading OP’s POI button so that it matches the other POI buttons in this package.
  5. CD’s improved Browse Map and Cockpit View icons, with matching toggle buttons while in Map View and Cockpit View.
  6. Ameridan’s revised flyover button, again just to be unique and replace the fly with a biplane.
    carlocator32.jpg
  7. Ameridan’s  revised Coordinates button (trail boots).
  8. Ameridan’s revised Address button (mailbox).
    carlocator15.jpg
  9. Name change to “Quicksilver CarLocator”.
  10. Reincorporated the factory Message Panel, along with my own buttons, since I felt the Quicksilver version was too bland.
    carlocator31.jpg
  11. I’ve also revised screens and icons to give this skin it’s own look (Version 1.42 was CD’s Quicksilver ’66 skin) and tweaked some of the original code that basically named the favorites Home and Work on some of the screens, regardless of any renaming you may have done, so that they reflect your changes as much as possible.

This skin by default names the two favorites Home and Car, and the main screen has a new button to program your current location and assigns it to Car, the intent being that it will facilitate finding your Car later.

This is a skin alternative, not an Unlock package, and can be used as a new skin without unlocking – just don’t use the Exit button.

To avoid a lot of confusion when doing Route preplanning, stay in Browse Map mode with Auto-Recalculation turned off, since Cockpit mode is always focused on your current location and will appear to be ignoring your route.


 coffeeon.gif  Version Log…

QuickSilver Reborn – A MioMap 3.3 Skin
Created By Ashwin Wavde
Inspired by Quicksilver for MioMap 3.2 by Matt Mullins (roscoe)

QuickSilver Reborn 1.0
* QuickSilver 1.0 for MioMap 3.2 modded for MioMap 3.3
* Added Cockpit Bar transparency
* Fixed turn distance guide visibility
* Various other improvements

QuickSilver Reborn 1.1
Compiled 2:56 PM 4/08/2007
*Adding compatability for split-screen data.zip

QuickSilver Reborn 1.3

*Added simple static car over arrow

Quicksilver ’66 for C230
*Icons redone by CD
*GTO car over cockpit arrow –  CD
*added toggle buttons cockpit view <-> browse map view – CD
*config folder fixed for C230 (roundabouts weren’t being announced) – ameridan

Quicksilver CarLocator for C230 1.45
Compiled 6:00 PM 2/15/2008
*2nd favorite tailored to Car location, rather than Work – ameridan
*All Favorite icons redone – ameridan
*New shortcut button on Main Screen to input location coordinates of parked car – ameridan

Quicksilver CarLocator for C230 1.46
Compiled 7:30 PM 2/27/2008
*added the the Binocular (Fit Route view on screen) and Route calculator (Recalculate toggling method each time) from the Olivercp Skin to the Browse Map screen – OP
*added POI button to cockpit screen – OP
*redid POI button to match others – ameridan

Quicksilver CarLocator 1.47
[probably the final version of CarLocator as community efforts to refine skin further will be without my dedicated CarLocator feature] – ameridan
Compiled 12:00 PM 3/6/2008
*toggle for displaying POI button added to Map Settings – OP
*redid flyover button – ameridan
*added pin/unpin button to browse_map cursor popup – ameridan


coffeeon.gif  Version 1.47 download is available HERE.    The file DATA.ZIP   should simply replace (after backing up your original) AS-IS (don’t unzip):
  •    \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap2\DATA.ZIP, if C230 is unlocked
  •    \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap\DATA.ZIP, if C230 is locked

OR if you are using my Menu with Skin Management, place DATA.ZIP into a folder in your SD card’s Skins folder named “Quicksilver CarLocator″ 


As an option to try out Dominique’s Skins trick in an unlocked C230, copy the “SKIN” folder from the  Version 1.46  download into \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap2  (or the contents of DATA.ZIP within should be added into  \My Flash Disk\MioMap\MioMap2\SKIN\DATA.ZIP).    See the Blog on Version 1.46 for more on this.


diriconbig.jpgWhat I have in mind for a geocache / straight-line navigation screen…

compass.jpg

By changing the value of compass_type in the [debug] section of SYS.TXT from the default of 0 to 1,2, or 3 [option 3 doesn’t appear to function in US units]- the compass arrow takes on a different appearance, as shown above.

I was hoping to find the bmp file that produces the compass images above, similiar to the diriconbig.bmp file that is used for visual indications in the cockpit screen (I’ve uncompressed it to see what it looks like  –  it is shown on the right).  

Using that as a guide, I wanted to produce a compass rose (like the one shown below) in various positions to produce a screen on this order.  If this doesn’t work out, perhaps we’ll just use #3 on a circular background instead.

simply.jpg

Or just use the same strategy that’s used to create the speedometer screen…

riksspeed.jpg

Now as murphy mentioned, the other hurdle to clear is getting the navigation computations to occur without having to use road data.   You are able to avoid highways, dirt roads, toll-roads, etc.,  so we’ve just got to figure out how to also avoid all other roads and streets.  )

To be continued…

(Here’s an iGO 8 screenshot that’s close)

igo8.jpg


No stylus required with this skin!! 

[Update 4/1/2008]  Made some headway this past week.

Quicksilver CarLocator 1.48
Compiled 4/1/2008 – ameridan

*fixed the Stop Recording Track Log button on the map screen that resulted in an error – ameridan
*flyover button tweaked – ameridan
*cursor button text changes from “Cursor” to “Close” when menu bar is opened – ameridan
*back button changed from small pale green arrow to larger yellow arrow – ameridan
*added “Clear Pins” button to History screen, and changed Clear button text to “Clear All” – ameridan
*Cockpit screen & Map screen menu bars – back button changed from down arrow to left arrow – ameridan
*****************************************************
MAJOR UPDATE TO BROWSE / NAV MAPS SETTINGS SCREEN – ameridan
*POI button on Cockpit screen (from ver 1.46) changed to Cockpit settings button for quick access to Settings
*display/hide toggle button in Cockpit settings menu in place of zoombar display/hide
*added toggle option in Cockpit settings for auto day/nite in double-button with manual toggle
*added toggle option for Cursor menu popup in double-button with Info show/hide toggle
*added track recording start/stop button  in double-button with Manage track logs button  – also serves as latge indicator that track logs are RECORDING.

When I think “Back” I expect a left arrow, so that’s what I’ve got now. This is what the normal Settings screen looks like now with the new “double-buttons” I’ve created.

clicking on the Settings icon (gear)…

gives you these options directly vs.

Comments (136)

QuickSilver CarLocator for C230~Version 1.46 update

carlocator11.jpg
Revised About screen available in General Settings
carlocator20.jpg
note the relocation of the zoom out button to make room for the new buttons on the left side
carlocator21.jpg
hit the calculator button…
carlocator22.jpg
…and the route recalculates in a different mode
carlocator23.jpg
note the addition of a POI button on the cockpit screen
carlocator24.jpg

QuickSilver CarLocator for C230 ~ Version 1.46 update

  1. OP’s incorporation of the Binocular button (Fit Route view on screen) and the Route calculator button (Recalculate toggling method each time, also known as the trip computer) borrowed from the Olivercp Skin (GREAT JOB OP!!) in the Browse Map screen
  2. OP’s incorporation of the POI button in the Cockpit screen
  3. I took the liberty of upgrading OP’s POI button so that it matches the other POI buttons in this package
  4. CD’s improved Browse Map and Cockpit View icons, with matching toggle buttons while in Map View and Cockpit View
  5. I’ve also revised screens and icons to give this skin it’s own look (Version 1.42 was CD’s Quicksilver ’66 skin) and tweaked some of the original code that basically named the favorites Home and Work on some of the screens, regardless of any renaming you may have done, so that they reflect your changes as much as possible.

This skin by default names the two favorites Home and Car, and the main screen has a new button to program your current location and assigns it to Car, the intent being that it will facilitate finding your Car later.

This is a skin alternative, not an Unlock package.   The instructions are aimed at those using my Unlock menu with Skin Management, but can be used as an alternative skin without unlocking – just don’t use the Exit button.

carlocator13.jpg
new icons introduced in ver 1.45
carlocator15.jpg
.
carlocator14.jpg

Clicking on the Save Car Location button saves 4 clicks…

carlocator2a.jpg

and takes you right to this screen…

carlocator16.jpg

Click on Coordinates, then Done, and your Car’s present parked location is in memory.

carlocator5a.jpg

Then, as an option, adding my “Favorite” icons and buttons with Dominique’s Skin Trick results in consistent display in other skins as well…

Sorry, but you won’t see all those heart icons for Favorites anymore if you incorporate this portion of the package.  )

carlocator7.jpg
.
carlocator8.jpg

Version 1.46 download available here.    Note that there are two folders that should each be copied to their respective locations:

  • The “Quicksilver CarLocator for C230″ folder should be placed in your SD card’s Skins folder
    OR the DATA.ZIP within should replace:
    •    My Flash DiskMioMapMioMap2DATA.ZIP, if C230 is unlocked
    •    My Flash DiskMioMapMioMapDATA.ZIP, if C230 is locked
  • As an option to try out Dominique’s Skins trick in an unlocked C230, copy the “SKIN” folder into My Flash DiskMioMapMioMap2  (or the contents of DATA.ZIP within should be added into  My Flash DiskMioMapMioMap2SKINDATA.ZIP).     Otherwise, just disregard this folder.

In  General Settings, you can rename Favorite#2 from Car back to Work if you like, but chances are you won’t be changing that location too much.

Another possible use for my modification?   Rename Car to Delivery.   Instead of creating POIs  each time a (Pizza) delivery person gets an order, just tap the Save Delivery Location button, input the address, and you are ready to Find your way to that location.

The main reason for stating that this version is for the C230 is that the config file is from a MioC230 and the mods/changes/updates were only applied to the 320X240 folders.  Having said that, this package could very well work for other Mio models with MioMap 3.3 and 320X240 screens in landscape mode.


Proposals for next revision  (1.47 – which may be the last for CarLocator):    

3/3/2008
  1. Name change to “Quicksilver CarLocator”    DONE
  2. OP’s toggle “POI button in Cockpit view” script    DONE
  3. Perhaps the pinpoint script if OP figures it out 🙂   DONE
  4. I like the factory message panel better    DONEcarlocator27.jpg
  5. Routes screen flyover button? (instead of the fly)     DONE
biplane.jpg
3/5/2008 
I’m planning to continue learning about, and working with skins, but depending on fellow Blog reader’s input, the CarLocator, which I’m quite happy with by the way, might not advance much further beyond the pending release of 1.47. 
Perhaps it will be the Quicksilver ’66 that resumes where we left off and advances by borrowing the best of various other skins already developed / being developed.

Comments (70)

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